Insights From

Elliott N. Weiss

Hits and misses in a bid for big-league money

To keep baseball a game worth playing, yet promote the self-determination of its players, MLB adopts policies intended to balance the competing American institutions of baseball and independence.

Lean Hospitals? How Lessons from Manufacturing Can Improve Health Care

Despite its origins in manufacturing, lean thinking has shown the potential to transform other process-oriented industries, including healthcare. According to Darden Professor Elliott N. Weiss, when it comes to process improvement and eliminating waste, lean is as effective in the hospital as it is on the factory floor.

Principles and Purpose: A Statement on Stakeholders

A group of prominent CEOs recently issued a statement encouraging business to create value for all stakeholders, not limited to investors. Ed Freeman and his colleagues have been working with Stakeholder Theory for decades. Here, Darden professors across disciplines offer examples of how businesses can (or already are) prioritizing stakeholders.

Creating a Culture of Excellence: Lessons from The 9 Cs Enterprise-Perspective Model, Part 2

To compete in today’s complex business environment, executives must excel at making decisions with an enterprise perspective. Darden Professor Elliott N. Weiss’ 9 Cs Enterprise-Perspective Model offers a useful decision-making framework.

How to Raise Your Leadership Game, Part 1: The 9 Cs Enterprise-Perspective Model

To compete in today’s complex business environment, executives must excel at making decisions with an enterprise perspective. Darden Professor Elliott N. Weiss’ 9 Cs Enterprise-Perspective Model offers a useful decision-making framework.

Energize the Chain: A Public-Private Partnership

Energize the Chain saves lives by keeping vaccines at temperatures necessary for efficacy. It’s a leading public-private partnership improving communities around the world.

Lean Practice: Cinch in the Waste

Through the continuous refinement of practices and procedures, lean management seeks to produce more goods more quickly while using fewer resources — less factory space, fewer worker movements and fewer assembly steps.