Insights From

Social Impact

Risk vs. Return: Social Impact Bonds and Lowering Returns to Prison

Lessons in philanthropy, investment and innovation: Rikers Island needed $10 million for a program to reduce the rate of teenage inmates returning to prison. With the innovative financing structure of the U.S.’ first social impact bond, New York, Goldman Sachs and Bloomberg Philanthropies leveraged private capital toward social solutions.

How a Stakeholder Approach to Community Improvement Is an Award-Winning Endeavor

Call it a win-win-win: The U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation honored Kroger for its Zero Hunger | Zero Waste initiative, which works to end hunger in its local communities and food waste in its entire company — victories for multiple stakeholders and the environment. Here’s how the initiative’s doing just that.

On Words: ‘Disruption’ and Climate Change? They Are Connected

Disruption is essential to economic growth and societal advancement. But a backlash is brewing, and some worry that the pace of new technologies leads to unintended consequences that are too great. Professor Mike Lenox discusses the pros and cons of disruption and the reason the right kind of aggressive innovation is critical to saving the world.

Doing Well While Doing Good: 5 Lessons on Empowered Consumers and Responsible Business

In an age in which the public is actively invested in the values of a company and reputations can change abruptly, corporate responsibility is both a moral and business imperative. Here, Darden experts offer insights on corporate social responsibility and the evolving relationship of business and society.

It’s All Goodio: Is Business Transparency Delicious?

Artisanal chocolatier Goodio’s tagline, “It’s all good,” represents its drive to succeed economically and in a socially responsible manner. The company serves as a case in point on how to embrace “radical transparency” in its efforts toward sustainability, nutrient preservation, and economic stability for farmers and employees.

Economic Inequality, Part 3: What Can Business Do About It?

Ideas discussed in Darden’s “Economic Inequality and Social Mobility” course taught by Professors Jim Freeland and Ed Freeman, as well as specific examples of what various businesses are doing to address income inequality.

Economic Inequality, Part 1: Where We Are and Why

For three years, Darden Professors Jim Freeland and Ed Freeman, initially with the help of Professor Ed Hess, have taught a popular course titled “Economic Inequality and Social Mobility” to help students become more aware of what may be one of the defining challenges of their lifetime — economic inequality — and to focus on what business can do to

Economic Inequality, Part 2: Where We’re Going and Why It Matters

Economic inequality may be one of the defining challenges of our time. Income mobility has decreased, and the reinforcing loops of economic and opportunity inequality correlate with health and societal harms. What will happen as artificial intelligence rises and human employment decreases?

Toward Adequate Housing for All

Darden Professors Frank Warnock and Veronica Cacdac Warnock bring their financial acumen to bear on one of the most pressing needs in the world — adequate housing.